The Game Changer Named TTP

September 6, 2019

College. We all know it. We all either love it or hate it. Something that my family always told me growing up is that college is the time in your life when you grow into the person you are supposed to be. I guess there is some truth in that but it also is frightening to think I have to become the person I’m “meant to be” at 18 to 22 years old. That’s WAY too young! Not even halfway through my life expectancy yet. I still don’t really know how to do laundry correctly and you think I know who I am as a human being? I’ve found that college isn’t really about finalizing who you are as a person but trying new things to proceed in the process of becoming that person.

 

Yet, change is one of those ideas that sends one’s anxiety through the roof. Why is that? What is so scary about change? Is it the fact that we’ve lived so successfully in the past that we no longer fear who we once were or is it that we live in a culture where failure and mistakes don’t feel like an option? Maybe it’s a little bit of both. I personally always have had a difficult time with change so you’re probably wondering how I am so comfortable jumping into the newness of college life.

 

That one thing is… TTP.

 

Now, what the heck is TTP? Well, throughout our recruitment process at Oklahoma City, our recruitment director uses this phrase almost religiously. Trust. The. Process. Also known as TTP. What does trust the process mean? Let life take its course. In the context of recruitment, it had to do with not getting your heart set on anything in particular because you’ll always end up where you are meant to be. This was so important for those of us involved in recruitment because oftentimes you get dropped by a sorority you loved or you don’t end up at your top choice but there is a reason you aren’t there. The universe is literally shouting at you like “Hey! That IS NOT home! Look over here!” If you let the process run, you don’t have to worry about where you’re supposed to be or how you’ll get there, the outcome will just land in your lap.

 

I feel like more college students could use a little TTP in their life. Everyone is so focused on being the best and doing everything right that they are just getting stuck in the same position they’ve always been. Breathe. Do it. Stop and breathe for a second. There’s no need to rush through life trying to grab everything in sight. Let life do its thing sometimes. Of course, you need to reach and fight for your goals but it’s okay to stop every once in a while and do something new. Try SOMETHING new every day. You’ll find that when you do, everything else in your life just gets a little bit easier. Sure, there’s going to be a LOT of failures that come with it. But without failure, how do we grow? When a baby deer is learning to walk and falls down, does it just sit there and give up? No! That deer’s going to get up and try again until its strong enough to run wild. It’s part of survival to fail for all other animals so it must be for us as well. Albert Einstein failed in so many areas of his life (failed an entrance exam into school, failed as an insurance salesman) but he never gave up and is now one of the most successful names in history. You have to stop stressing about who you are and what you’re doing and let the world help you out a little. Soon enough, you’ve grown into a whole new person (don’t worry, it’s for the better).

 

TTP has helped me through my adjustment into college tremendously. I know that I can try new things and be open to new possibilities in my life without fearing failure. Now is the time to fail, while were still young and free. So, go out there and trust that process. You never know the person you’ll discover next time you look in the mirror. 

 

 

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